Immediate responses of cyst nematode, soil-borne pathogens and soybean yield to one-season crop disturbance after continuous soybean in northeast China

Document Type: Research Paper

Authors

1 Key Laboratory of Mollisols Agroecology, Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology, CAS, 150081, Harbin, China.

2 Stockbridge School of Agriculture, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, 01003, USA.

3 ey Laboratory of Mollisols Agroecology, Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology, CAS, 150081, Harbin, China.

Abstract

Habitat disturbance affects numerous ecosystem components and processes, but
its effect on continuous soybean system is less available. Soybean was seeded
following six preceding crops, including grain soybean (Glycine max L. Merill.),
wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.), tobacco (Nicotiana
tabacum L.), corn (Zea mays L.) and hemp (Cannabis Satia L.), on a Mollisol
farmland that had previously been cropped to continuous soybean for seven years
in Northeast China. Soybean after hemp reduced the number of second-stage
juveniles of soybean cyst nematode (J2) by 29.8% compared to continuous
soybean, while soybean after corn had the lowest J2 number. The number of soilborne
pathogens of Fusarium, Rhizoctonia and Pythium after corn and hemp and
root rot disease severity index after all crop disturbance, except sugar beet, were
significantly lower than continuous soybean. Soybean yield after hemp disturbance
was improved by 10.8%, while sugar beet disturbance had the greatest negative
impact on soybean yield. No differences were found among crop disturbance for
protein and oil content in soybean seed. Crop disturbance changed the habitat
already developed in the continuous soybean system. Adoption of hemp disturbance
has the potential to be an alternative approach in managing continuous soybean
production system in Northeast China.

Keywords